1. Withaferin A (WA) FAQS

    Withaferin A (WA) is derived from the medical plant Withania somnifera (commonly known as ashwagandha or Indian winter cherry), which has been safely used for centuries in Indian Ayurvedic medicine for treatment of different ailments. Suppresion of angiogenisis, alteration of cytoskeletal architecture, and inhibition of proteasomal activity by WA has also been documented.
  2. WY-14,643 - Pirinixic acid

    Pirinixic acid (Wy-14,643) is an agonistWY-14,643 - Pirinixic Acid of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) subtype α exhibiting beneficial effects in various inflammation-related processes in a slow, long-termed fashion.
  3. Exploring the uses of pepstatin A

    Pepstatin A is of microbial origin and is an N-acyl-pentapeptide, more accurately: isovaleryl-L-valyl-L-valyl-statyl-L-alanyl-statine. Pepstatin A was found to be a potent competitive inhibitor of most aspartic proteases but a weak inhibitor of renin.
  4. Thaxtomin A affects CESA-complex density, expression of cell wall genes, cell wall composition, and causes ectopic lignification in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings

    Thaxtomin A, a phytotoxin produced by Streptomyces eubacteria, is suspected to act as a natural cellulose synthesis inhibitor. This view is confirmed by the results obtained from new chemical, molecular, and microscopic analyses of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings treated with thaxtomin A.
  5. Chemotin and HIF-1

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a transcriptional complex that is activated in response to hypoxia and growth factors. HIF-1 plays a central role in tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis.
  6. Cycloheximide-induced T-cell Death Is Mediated by a Fas-associated Death Domain-dependent Mechanism

    Cycloheximide (CHX) can contribute to apoptotic processes, either in conjunction with another agent (e.g. tumor necrosis factor-α) or on its own. The apoptotic process is now known to involve the well orchestrated interactions of cell death receptors, death receptor adaptors, caspases, and Bcl-2 family members.
  7. How mitotic inhibitors work in Chemotherapy.

    The Salk Institute says it appears to have serendipitously solved a long standing mystery about how a key class of chemotherapy drugs work, which could lead to better ways of fighting a wide variety of cancers, including tumors of the breast, ovaries, colon, lung and prostate.
  8. Want to see your genome on a smartphone?

    Portable Genomics, a new La Jolla startup, is seeking investors to help underwrite its plan to commercially develop software that can display a person's genetic information on such devices as smartphones and electronic tablets.
  9. Innovator Tracks Everything His Body Does

    Larry Smarr stops a visitor and says, “Before you go, let me show you my stool sample.” The UC San Diego physicist-futurist reaches into his kitchen refrigerator, past the milk, and pulls out a small white box. He marvels over its contents. “The bacteria in here contains more info than you’d find on a computer chip,” Smarr says. “It’s a window into your health. Within 10 years, people won’t dream of going to a doctor without first getting a sample like this.” Feeling squeamish? Smarr can have that effect on people. Virtually nothing is out-of-bounds these days when he promotes the “Quantified Self,” an emerging movement in which people use biosensors and other gadgets to closely monitor their bodies in the name of wellness.

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