1. EDAC HCl Reducing Agent: Frequently Asked Questions

    EDAC HCl Reducing Agent: Frequently Asked Questions
    EDAC HCl Reducing Agent: Frequently Asked Questions AG Scientific is a leading supplier of EDAC HCl. Here we review some of the most frequently asked questions about this useful reducing agent: 1. What is EDAC HCl? EDAC Hydrochloride is a versatile modern reducing agent. It is an easily handled solid with high solubility in water and organic solvents such as dichloromethane...
  2. TCEP Reducing Agent: Frequently Asked Questions

    TCEP Reducing Agent: Frequently Asked Questions
    TCEP Reducing Agent: Frequently Asked Questions AG Scientific is a leading supplier of TCEP HCl. Here we review some of the most frequently asked questions about this useful reducing agent: What is TCEP? This is a useful reducing agent with applications in molecular biology, biochemistry and microbiology Are there alternative names for this product? TCEP hydrochloride Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine hydrochloride   Fig 1...
  3. DTE Reducing Agent: Frequently Asked Questions

    DTE Reducing Agent: Frequently Asked Questions
    DTE Reducing Agent: Frequently Asked Questions AG Scientific is a leading supplier of DTE reducing agent. Here we review some of the most frequently asked questions about this useful chemical: What is DTE? DTE (formally 1,4-Dithioerythritol) is an epimer of DTT (dithiothreitol). This sugar is derived from the corresponding 4-carbon monosaccharide erythrose and contains sulfur. It is an epimer of...
  4. 5 Things to Consider When Choosing Biological Buffers

    5 Things to Consider When Choosing Biological Buffers
    5 Things to Consider When Choosing Biological Buffers According to ThoughtCo., biological buffers usually consist of a conjugate base and a weak acid or a conjugate acid and weak base. A buffer is a type of solution that helps maintain stable pH levels. Successful research is dependent on finding and using the right buffer. The following are five important aspects...
  5. IPTG: Frequently Asked Questions and Protocols

    IPTG: Frequently Asked Questions and Protocols
    IPTG is a molecular biology reagent utilized in cloning experiments. This compound is used as a molecular mimic of allolactose, a lactose metabolite that triggers transcription of the lacoperon. Unlike allolactose, the IPTG sulfur (S) atom creates a chemical bond which is non-hydrolyzable by the cell, preventing the cell from "eating up" or degrading the inductant; therefore the IPTG concentration remains constant.
  6. CHAPS Detergent: Protocols and Frequently Asked Questions

    CHAPS Detergent: Protocols and Frequently Asked Questions
    A nondenaturing zwitterionic detergent for solubilizing membrane proteins and breaking protein-protein interactions. Combines the useful properties of both the sulfobetaine-type and the bile salt detergents. Commonly used for protein solubilization in isoelectric focusing and two-dimensional electrophoresis especially for non-denaturing (without urea) isoelectric focusing.
  7. RNase A: Frequently Asked Questions

    RNase A: Frequently Asked Questions
    Introduction to RNase Ribonucleases (RNases) are a large group of hydrolytic enzymes that degrade ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules. These are nucleases that catalyze the breakdown of RNA into smaller components. They are a superfamily of enzymes which catalyze the degradation of RNA, operating at the levels of transcription and translation. 3D conformation of ribonuclease A enzyme These enzymes are present...
  8. IPTG Triggers the Transcription of the Lac Operon

    IPTG Triggers the Transcription of the Lac Operon
    Isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside, abbreviated IPTG, is a molecular biology reagent. This compound is used as a molecular mimic of allolactose, a lactose metabolite that triggers transcription of the lac operon.
  9. Dithiothreitol (DTT) Applications You Must Know

    Dithiothreitol (DTT) Applications You Must Know
    Dithiothreitol (DTT), also known as Cleland's reagent, is a small-molecule redox reagent. Its oxidized form is a disulfide-bonded 6-membered ring. DTT has an epimeric ('sister') compound, dithioerythritol (DTE).
  10. Frequently Asked Questions About Proteinase K

    Frequently Asked Questions About Proteinase K
    In molecular biology Proteinase K (also protease K or endopeptidase K) is a broad-spectrum serine protease. The enzyme was discovered in 1974 in extracts of the fungus Engyodontium album (formerly Tritirachium album). Proteinase K is able to digest native keratin (hair), hence, the name "Proteinase K". The predominant site of cleavage is the peptide bond adjacent to the carboxyl group of aliphatic and aromatic amino acids with blocked alpha amino groups. It is commonly used for its broad specificity.

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