1. Calyculin A: Potent Tumor Promoter Used in Mouse Skin Experiment

    Calyculin A, a marine toxin isolated from Disodermia calyx, is a structurally distinct inhibitor of PP1 (protein phosphatase 1) and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2). It has been shown that Calyculin A displays inhibitory properties towards the endogenous phosphatase of smooth muscle myosin B and induces contraction in the muscle fibers.
  2. A Guide to Necroptosis Inhibitors

    There is extensive evidence that necrosis plays a prominent role in a wide range of human pathological conditions, such as myocardial infarct, ischemic injury and neurodegeneration. Therefore, development of necrosis inhibitors is of high interest.
  3. Withaferin A (WA) FAQS

    Withaferin A (WA) is derived from the medical plant Withania somnifera (commonly known as ashwagandha or Indian winter cherry), which has been safely used for centuries in Indian Ayurvedic medicine for treatment of different ailments. Suppresion of angiogenisis, alteration of cytoskeletal architecture, and inhibition of proteasomal activity by WA has also been documented.
  4. Cycloheximide-induced T-cell Death Is Mediated by a Fas-associated Death Domain-dependent Mechanism

    Cycloheximide (CHX) can contribute to apoptotic processes, either in conjunction with another agent (e.g. tumor necrosis factor-α) or on its own. The apoptotic process is now known to involve the well orchestrated interactions of cell death receptors, death receptor adaptors, caspases, and Bcl-2 family members.
  5. Guide to Necrosis Signaling Pathway Inhibitors

    Necrosis is the premature death of cells in living tissue and can be caused by external factors to the cell or tissue, such as infection, toxins, cancer, infarction, poisons, ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species), inflammation or trauma. Necrosis inhibitors can counteract the effects that may normally cause cell death.   Historically, cell death has been subdivided into regulated (apoptosis, AKA programmed...

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