1. Beta-Lactamase and Microbial Antibiotic Resistance

    Beta-Lactamase and Microbial Antibiotic Resistance
    β-Lactamases continue to be the leading cause of resistance to β-lactam antibiotics among gram-negative bacteria. In recent years there has been an increased incidence and prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), enzymes that hydrolyze and cause resistance to oxyimino-cephalosporins and aztreonam.
  2. A Guide to the 8 Most Common Classes of Antibiotics

    A Guide to the 8 Most Common Classes of Antibiotics
    A Guide to the 8 Most Common Classes of Antibiotics Antibiotics have prevented millions of deaths and radically changed healthcare during the last century. There are dozens of different types of antibiotics, with each of them grouped into different classes. The following list includes eight of the most common classes of antibiotics, what they are generally used for and some...
  3. Top 7 FAQs About Beta-Lactamase

    Top 7 FAQs About Beta-Lactamase
    As a core structure in many antibiotics, the beta-lactam ring is a cyclic amide. Beta-lactam antibiotics almost universally inhibit bacterial cell wall synthesis and thus induce the destruction of bacterial cells. Bacteria have evolved an enzyme that combats this antibiotic and increases resistance to death induced by antibiotic means: the beta-lactamase enzyme. Beta-lactamase enzymes can be used in a multitude...
  4. OUTSMARTING MRSA BACTERIA

    A 12-year-old boy who was diving for a basketball in his school gym in New York City got a cut on his arm. The incident was nothing out of the ordinary, but bacteria entered Rory Staunton’s bloodstream through the cut; he developed sepsis and died three days later. The New York Times carried the story of how rapidly the infection progressed and remained undiagnosed until it was too late.

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